:(

I miss you terribly terribly terribly much all of a sudden. I know we are left with only 20 days but it doesn’t seem to get by any easier ūüė¶ 20 more days more and I can run into your arms to cry and laugh again. Honestly quite sick of myself thinking about you too……… can’t wait to be physically reunited again.

You have been such a blessing.

Still quite sour from my terribly done examination paper from Tuesday. I guess it sucked more because I knew I enjoyed the module. Maybe the most, out of the 8 this year. We really learnt beyond the scope of what a Geography student is really exposed to and the professors were so good. I suppose when you enjoy something you really want to do well in it.

I fear doing badly in the rest of the papers and subsequently using my grades as a determinant as to how much I enjoyed the module. So before I take the rest of the examinations and receive my potentially terrible grades back I am going to have to remind myself that the best decision I made this year was to take a majority of Physical Geography modules. I came into UCL with a preference for Human Geography modules, because that was exactly where my interest lied when I was in JC.  But I ended up slanting towards Physical Geography because despite my sub-par performance for the Environmental Change module last year I thought it was the only one that stretched me way beyond my comfort zone. There has been no regret at all ever since, despite the fact that I go to class and sit alone now.

I loved the field trips this year. I loved all the professors and how keen they were in making us identify species on the field, and how they excitedly demonstrated all the coring techniques while rowing around on a sea boat.

I loved the modules and I enjoyed completing every single coursework simply I learnt so much each time. I started off with lots of hate for STELLA because it was so complicated, but after getting through the initiation and familiarisation with the software I was so amazed by its outputs. Everything we had done in our coursework was in direct relevance to climate change projection and modelling that I had always mentioned about in my essays in passing, even in JC. I disliked Hydrology when I was in JC simply because it was pure memory work and so crazily intense¬†— this academic year I have had the honour of being taught by Julian and Richard, both leading academics in the field of groundwater abstraction, subsidence and of course, climate change impacts on water resources. When they were doing their PhDs with crazily beautifully constructed diagrams and location maps I wasn’t even born yet. Their papers are always so well-written¬†and I¬†am continually impressed by the originality and detail that goes into each scientific paper they compose individually. On a separate note I loved the diatom and ostracods practical session by Viv and it felt like I was brought back to secondary school when I placed ostracods on a glass test slide to examine and identify it through a microscope. Except that this was extremely relevant to the field on palaeoclimatology, especially as we were concurrently working¬†on the statistics coursework for diatom reconstruction of acidification values.

I also managed to learn a bit of Environmental Biology when I memorised details about homozygotes and heterozygotes and their differing fitness levels, and the evidence of sympatric speciation through an examination of the molecular phylogenetics within the Monostroma latissimum species. Before I left for studies this academic year HT once asked me whether I knew what Drosophila was. It was a pleasant surprise when I saw this very term flipping through the Ecology textbook that our module was based on.

I have really enjoyed how the year has put together subjects that I studied for in the past — especially in greater relation to Chemistry within the Hydrology module. I want to remind myself that I truly enjoyed what I learnt this year and I will not define my growth academically by the numbers I see eventually.

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